University of Twente Student Theses

Login

Too worried to act? A correlational study on climate worry, climate anxiety and pro-environmental behaviors among young adults

Wittrock, S. (2021) Too worried to act? A correlational study on climate worry, climate anxiety and pro-environmental behaviors among young adults.

[img] PDF
2MB
Abstract:Climate change has far-reaching consequences for the future of young adults, causing great anxiety for many of them. As a result of this development, the concept of “climate anxiety” has gained major attention. Though, when talking about climate anxiety it is important to distinguish between worry and ‘real’ anxiety about climate change, as these reactions possibly have opposing effects on young adults’ pro-environmental behaviors (PEB). This distinction may thus explain why current literature reports both constructive and unconstructive variations of climate ‘anxiety’, which either mobilize or inhibit young adults to behave pro-environmentally. Therefore, this research investigated the relation between climate worry/ anxiety and PEBs among young adults. In doing so, this study differentiated between private and public-sphere PEBs and additionally, examined mediation effects of perceived self and collective efficacy. A cross-sectional study design was applied and 247 young adults responded to an online survey. By conducting partial correlations, climate worry was found to be positively associated with private and public-sphere PEBs (r=.24 and r=.15, respectively). Climate anxiety was positively associated with public-sphere PEBs (r=.29) and not associated with private-sphere PEBs. Moreover, separate mediation analyses with PROCESS showed that perceived self and collective efficacy did not mediate these associations. While keeping in mind various research limitations, the results imply that young adults likely cope with their climate worry and climate anxiety in constructive ways. Future research should study these associations more closely and particularly investigate how other factors, such as a green self-identity and positive eco-emotions, can account for a constructive response in worried/ anxious young adults.
Item Type:Essay (Bachelor)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:77 psychology
Programme:Psychology BSc (56604)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/87438
Export this item as:BibTeX
EndNote
HTML Citation
Reference Manager

 

Repository Staff Only: item control page