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Deception detection and eye-tracking : how are they affected by cognitive load and training?

Bodur, S.Y. (2021) Deception detection and eye-tracking : how are they affected by cognitive load and training?

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Abstract:In general, people are bad at detecting lies and do not know indicative non-verbal and verbal deception cues. Laypeople mostly guess and have an accuracy rate around chance level. By incorporating cognitive load theory and the eye mind link, this research wants to explore how training in non-verbal deception cues can influence cognitive load and veracity judgment accuracy with the aid of eye-tracking. This is done in a comparative between-subject experimental research. There is a sample of 41 participants separated into training and no-training groups. Both groups participate in an interview, where an actor plays the role of a suspect in a mock-crime scenario. During this interview, the gaze behaviour of the participant gets recorded to estimate cognitive load and which cues they attend. Afterwards, they fill out three questionnaires about their biases, their cognitive load, and their judge-ment. It was investigated how they perform regarding veracity judgement accuracy and how cognitively demanding they perceived the interview. It turned out that the training did not influence the self-perceived cognitive load, fixation durations nor the veracity judgement accuracy. All hypotheses were rejected. This is probably because non-verbal cues are not reliable cues for deception. This is probably because non-verbal cues are not reliable cues for deception. Further it might that the training was too short of giving significant results.
Item Type:Essay (Bachelor)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:77 psychology
Programme:Psychology BSc (56604)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/87477
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