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To what extent is the personality trait neuroticism related to student’s perceived stress levels in daily life?

Wagener, H. (2021) To what extent is the personality trait neuroticism related to student’s perceived stress levels in daily life?

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Abstract:Background. Prior studies focused on assessing the association between Neuroticism and perceived stress levels using retrospective approaches. However, this relationship has not been investigated yet in daily life neglecting the fluctuating nature of stress and leaving room for recall biases. Objective. This study replicated the association between Neuroticism and general perceived stress levels using a retrospective approach. Further, the association between Neuroticism and average state stress levels was examined in daily life. Finally, it was investigated whether high Neuroticism was related to higher variations in state stress. Method. An Experience Sampling Study was conducted for eight days with 44 university students (Mage = 21.09, 81.8% females) on the basis of convenience sampling. Besides the trait measurements (Eysenck Neuroticism-Scale derived from the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised Short Form (EPQR-S) and the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS)) assessing the trait Neuroticism and general perceived stress, a single-item question (SNRS-11) assessed participants’ average perceived state stress levels and state stress variations three times a day. Results. Three simple linear regression analyses were used in order to assess the present hypotheses. Here, a positive significant association was found between Neuroticism and general perceived stress, implying that individuals high in Neuroticism experience higher recalled stress levels than individuals low in Neuroticism. Further, another positive significant association was discovered between Neuroticism and reported state stress, indicating that individuals high in Neuroticism reported higher average stress on a daily basis. No significant association was found between Neuroticism and variations in state stress. Conclusion. This study provides insights into the association between Neuroticism and perceived stress levels. Results indicate that individuals high in Neuroticism report higher daily state stress, similarly to general perceived stress. Smartphone interventions should aim at supporting people high in Neuroticism in daily life by providing suitable coping techniques.
Item Type:Essay (Bachelor)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:77 psychology
Programme:Psychology BSc (56604)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/87479
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