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Is seeking social support a protective factor weakening the association between perceived stress and insomnia in young adults’ family members of former ICU patients? A Survey Study

Kühne, M.U. (2021) Is seeking social support a protective factor weakening the association between perceived stress and insomnia in young adults’ family members of former ICU patients? A Survey Study.

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Abstract:Family members of former ICU patients often suffer from health issues, summarized under the term post-intensive care syndrome (PICS-F). Among others, especially younger age family members are at risk. Insomnia is one of the most prevalent disorders for young adulthood. Social support-seeking behavior has shown to be beneficial in decreasing symptoms of insomnia. The study investigated social support-seeking behavior weakening the association between perceived stress and insomnia of young adults’ family members of former ICU patients. Method: A convenience sample of 128 students from the University of Twente, as well as German and Dutch community members, was taken. After exclusion, 57 young adults aged between 18 and 29 (Mage=22.7; 70.2% female) took part in the cross-sectional survey study. Participants were assessed for subjective insomnia symptoms with the Holland Sleep Disorder Questionnaire (α = 0.91), for levels of perceived stress with the Perceived Stress Scale (α = 0.96), and for seeking social support with the Coping Strategies Inventory (α = 0.85). Multiple linear regression analysis was used to test whether seeking social support moderates the association between perceived stress and insomnia. Results: On average, the criterion value of 3.68 for insomnia was not exceeded (M = 3.13, SD = .96). Perceived stress was positively associated with insomnia ( = .61, p = .00). However, seeking social support was not found to be a significant moderator in the association between perceived stress and insomnia ( = .61, p = .36). Conclusion: Young adults’ family members of former ICU patients experience high levels of stress leading to symptoms of insomnia. However, on average, young relatives did not show symptoms of insomnia. Seeking social support was not a protective factor in the association between perceived stress and insomnia. Future research is needed to test for beneficial coping strategies weakening the association between perceived stress and insomnia.
Item Type:Essay (Bachelor)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:77 psychology
Programme:Psychology BSc (56604)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/87569
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