University of Twente Student Theses

Login

Lost in abstraction : how analogy-mapping as a procedure for cognitive support might benefit mental modeling of a real-world target constructs when using a simulation-based source construct

Wanrooij, C. (2007) Lost in abstraction : how analogy-mapping as a procedure for cognitive support might benefit mental modeling of a real-world target constructs when using a simulation-based source construct.

[img] Microsoft Word
1MB
[img] PDF
1MB
Abstract:Based on research on analogy based reasoning in cognitive psychology, computer science and A.I., and the computational and cognitive models derived from this research, this paper proposes a cognitive support procedure for helping students map analogous concepts and relations between real-world target principles and analogous computer-based simulations onto each other. Three assumptions drive this research: 1) That computer based simulations are analogies of reality; 2) that in at least some cases students should be made aware of the limited correspondence between reality and simulation for the benefit of accurate mental modeling; and 3) that encouraging students to reason about this limited correspondence by means of analogy can facilitate accurate mental modeling, especially since 4) analogy based reasoning is thought to be a very natural and intelligent practice. Since analogy based reasoning is thought to be a vital learning mechanism in adults and children, analogy mapping is viewed as an inherently natural process and, therefore, hypothesized to be an effective educational practice. An analogy mapping tool or procedure might help students understand an analogy, its shortcomings in explaining a target principle, and may also help prevent students from making undetectable erroneous inferences. Finally, because this paper deals specifically with teaching the evolutionary principle of natural selection, analogy mapping was thought to provide yet another advantage: To help discover specific preconceptions that lead students to reject the concept under study, and provide a means to get around these preconception or at least pinpoint them so that they can be appropriately addressed. The effects of analogy mapping were compared to those of concept mapping. No statistically significant advantages of analogy mapping over simple concept mappings were found, however. Some conclusions on teaching natural selection and evolution are drawn
Item Type:Essay (Master)
Clients:
NIOO-KNAW
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:05 communication studies
Programme:Psychology MSc (66604)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/58963
Export this item as:BibTeX
EndNote
HTML Citation
Reference Manager

 

Repository Staff Only: item control page