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Causation versus effectuation in entrepreneurial decision-making: the impact of family resources, family business background and education

Pot, J.J.M. (2014) Causation versus effectuation in entrepreneurial decision-making: the impact of family resources, family business background and education.

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Abstract:The goal of this study is to find out to what extent family resources, family business background and education influence entrepreneurs in regards to their entrepreneurial decision-making. In recent years, entrepreneurship and entrepreneurial ventures have been the subject of many studies and thesis. yet our knowledge on entrepreneurship is still limited and lacks an all embracing framework in regards to entrepreneurial processes. This study combines the work of four different authors, namely Gartner (1985), Bruyat and Julien (200), Sarasvathy (2001) and Shane (2003) hoping to shed some light on the current blackbox called "situational context". After comparing all four models, it seemed likely that family resources, family business background and education played a role in whether someone favours causation over effectuation when making entrepreneurial decisions. Seventeen American student-entrepreneurs participated in this study. They were asked to solve a case covering several problems one encounters when starting a business, while using the speak aloud method. The students were then asked several questions in order to determine whether external factors such as time constraints or difficulties with the speak aloud method influenced the answers given. They were also asked to fill in a survey containing the Chandler scale (2009) and several additional questions used to determine whether the answers given when solving the case were representative. Afterwards, the coding was compared to the coding was compared to the coding done by another researcher and the inter-rator reliability of this study as found to be 0.68. The only hypothesis posited and supported by this study is that students that are studying a business related study are more likely to use causal processes than effectual processes.
Item Type:Essay (Master)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:70 social sciences in general, 83 economics, 86 law
Programme:Business Administration MSc (60644)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/64645
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