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The influences of self-control demands and education on burnout and work engagement

Oude Rengerink, K. (2016) The influences of self-control demands and education on burnout and work engagement.

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Abstract:Background. Burnout is increasing in the Netherlands: During 2013, 12% of the working population suffered from emotional exhaustion, one of the main components of burnout. This exhaustion might be due to the dynamic environments where self-management and self-control have become more important. For instance, withholding spontaneous reactions drains self-control strength, whereas an insufficient amount of self-control strength leads to higher self-control demands, which can impair cognitive, emotional, and behavioural actions and can also lead to burnout. However, work engagement and psychological detachment can buffer the effects of burnout. Finklestein (2007) found that the higher educated have more resources to cope with stress and are, therefore, less vulnerable to stress and burnout. This study focuses on the effect of level of education on the relationship between self-control demands and burnout. Method. A cross-sectional study was conducted using a survey. A sample of 268 employees of various industries and companies volunteered to participate in a study, creating a 75% response rate (n = 268). Results. The results of this study are as expected from the literature: (1) Self-control demands are mainly responsible for generating burnout; (2) higher levels of education decrease burnout,(3) psychological detachment decreases burnout and is a moderator in the relationship between self-control demands and burnout; (4) work engagement lowers burnout, although it cannot be concluded whether this differs among education levels. Conclusion. The most important finding is that level of education and work engagement have a strong relationship with burnout and might be extremely important for employees in order to not burnout. Psychological detachment is a moderator in the relationship between self-control demands and burnout, and it also reduces burnout.
Item Type:Essay (Master)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:05 communication studies, 70 social sciences in general, 77 psychology
Programme:Communication Studies MSc (60713)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/70832
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