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The role of world assumptions in the severity of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder : differentiating between gender

Stappen, A. (2017) The role of world assumptions in the severity of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder : differentiating between gender.

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Abstract:Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is the development of anxiety based symptoms, which can occur after experiencing or witnessing a traumatic event. Literature has shown that women seem to be more vulnerable in developing/maintaining PTSD and suffer from more severe symptoms. The overall goal of this study was to determine the role of world assumptions, when explaining why women seem to have worse PTSD symptoms than men. Data was collected over 11 years and included 1169 participants. To measure the world assumptions, the world assumption scale was used. To measure the severity of symptoms, the self-inventory (ZIL) was used. To measure the specific traumatic events that were experienced by the participants, researchers established a questionnaire called the LIFE questionnaire. Contradictory to what was expected, this study could not yield support of women having worse PTSD symptoms than men. The planned mediation analysis, whether world assumptions can explain the relationship between gender and PTSD severity, could therefore not be tested. Furthermore, results showed a positive correlation between negative world assumptions and severity of PTSD. It suggested that men experience a higher number of traumatic events than women. Overall, results of the study are in contradiction literature findings. Limitations and implications are discussed.
Item Type:Essay (Bachelor)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:77 psychology
Programme:Psychology BSc (56604)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/72771
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