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Comparing the performance of Dutch business and knowledge ecosystems : examining the influence of ecosystem participant roles and configurations

Otten, A. (2017) Comparing the performance of Dutch business and knowledge ecosystems : examining the influence of ecosystem participant roles and configurations.

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Abstract:The goal of this study was to find the influence of different ecosystem leaders and supportive organizations on ecosystem performance. It was theorized that high participant diversity and the presence of different roles in an ecosystem leads to high performance. A configurational approach using QCA was taken to examine which combination(s) of ecosystem participants led to high performance and which led to low performance. Diversity was based on the presence of manifest companies, universities and institutes, high quality environment, investors and incubators or accelerators. Performance was operationalized through three measures: ecosystem growth in terms of firms, spin-offs, and employment. The results indicate that maximum diversity in the sense of participant roles is not always required to achieve high performance in an ecosystem. Furthermore, different needs for each of the manifest organizations to achieve high ecosystem performance have been found. Moreover, a manifest company was deemed sufficient for firm and employment growth in an ecosystem. Interestingly, the manifest university was not associated with spin-off or employment growth, and only with firm growth. An investor is found to be necessary for spin-off growth, confirming their need for funding to develop. Furthermore, the results indicate a conflict in certain combinations of multiple manifest organizations and found that more than one manifest organization in an ecosystem has only limited added value towards performance. Future research should take additional roles into account (e.g. regulator or dominator) as well as delve further into the activities manifest organizations undertake to increase performance and the conflict between them. Uncovering the primary needs of spin-offs and sources of employment growth in ecosystems could validate thoughts raised in this study.
Item Type:Essay (Master)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:85 business administration, organizational science
Programme:Business Administration MSc (60644)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/73481
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