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The influence of traffic light labels and choices logos on healthy food choice : an eye-tracking study : a field experiment using mobile eye-tracking.

Nicolaas, Iris (2017) The influence of traffic light labels and choices logos on healthy food choice : an eye-tracking study : a field experiment using mobile eye-tracking.

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Abstract:Since the Dutch government relied on the Choices logos for the last ten years, this research examined the following research question: how do traffic light labels and Choices logos influence healthy food choice in the Netherlands? A field experiment using mobile eye-tracking has been conducted, in which 48 participants chose one pack of yoghurt out of 12 packages. Four of these packages had a traffic light label, four had a Choices logo and four had no logo. Results demonstrated that participants fixated almost 1.5 times longer and more often on traffic light labels than on Choices logos. Participants in the low time constraints condition fixated almost 1.5 times longer and more often on traffic light labels and Choices logos, as compared to participants in the high time constraints condition. The degree of General Health Interest of these participants did not influence visual attention. Furthermore, only familiarity with Choices logos had some effect on visual attention towards Choices logos in terms of fixation count. It can be concluded that traffic light labels acquire higher visual attention from Dutch consumers than Choices logos do. However, the effect of time constraints on visual attention is not different for traffic light labels and Choices logos. Furthermore, for consumers with high General Health Interest, low time constraints lead to higher visual attention than high time constraints. Only familiarity with Choices logos will influence visual attention towards Choices logos in terms of fixation count. However, the amount of visual attention to traffic light labels and/or Choices logos does not influence healthy food choice.
Item Type:Essay (Master)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:05 communication studies
Programme:Communication Studies MSc (60713)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/74071
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