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Work hard, party hard(er) : commitment in the temporary work context of music festivals.

Jansen, M. (2017) Work hard, party hard(er) : commitment in the temporary work context of music festivals.

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Abstract:PURPOSE: Music festivals are special work contexts because of their temporary nature. The purpose of this study was to explore affective commitment of music festival employees and the extent to which their commitment is related to work characteristics and perceived organizational support, by means of human resource management practices. METHOD: A qualitative research including interviews with 21 music festival employees from three agencies and one festival organization were done. Interview topics included work experiences and characteristics, affective commitment and HRM practices. RESULTS: The findings of the research revealed that commitment of music festival employees could be targeted to four main foci. The main finding was that employees are especially committed to their occupation, stimulated by job satisfaction and social interactions. Commitment to music festivals and festival organizations was found to be relatively weak, which could be declared by the ephemeral work relationship between music festival organizations and their employees. However, the degree to which music festival employees are committed to music festivals could be related to several specific work characteristics and HRM practices. Agency workers showed large variety in commitment levels to their agencies, which is mainly attributed to the way those agencies use HRM practices.Agency workers showed large variety in commitment levels to their agencies, which is mainly attributed to the way those agencies use HRM practices. CONCLUSIONS: Based on the results, it seems that music festival employees are more likely to be committed to their occupation instead of the festival or festival organization they work for, mainly because of the temporary nature of festival work. However, several particular work characteristics and HRM practices, that stimulate perceived organizational support, seem to influence commitment to festivals in a positive way. Furthermore, it is argued that agencies that strive for a committed workforce could also benefit from implementing HRM practices that encourage perceived organizational support. Further practical implications for festival organizations and agencies, limitations of the conducted study, and directions for future research are discussed.
Item Type:Essay (Master)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:05 communication studies, 70 social sciences in general
Programme:Communication Studies MSc (60713)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/74291
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