University of Twente Student Theses

Login

The intention of Dutch teenagers’: getting vaccinated or not? : A study about how conceptual influences, individual and/or social group influences and vaccination specific issues influences the intention to get vaccinated

Schulenburg, Lisanne Christina Maria (2019) The intention of Dutch teenagers’: getting vaccinated or not? : A study about how conceptual influences, individual and/or social group influences and vaccination specific issues influences the intention to get vaccinated.

[img]
Preview
PDF
1MB
Abstract:Introduction The decreasing vaccination coverage is related to a lower acceptance or refusal of vaccines despite the availability of vaccine services, also called vaccine hesitancy. The determinants that influence the behavioural decision to accept, delay or reject some or all vaccinations can be described under contextual influences, individual/social group influences, and vaccination specific issues. To stop the vaccination coverage from decreasing and to develop targeted strategies, there is knowledge needed about reasons for vaccine hesitancy. There is currently no knowledge available about reasons for vaccine hesitancy among teenagers and why they are intended to vaccinate or not. Additionally, a policy measure is developed, namely the extra vaccination call-up for 16- and 17-year aged teenagers who are not (completely) vaccinated, but the elaboration of the policy measure is not there yet. With investigating which determinants are influencing whether teenagers are intended to vaccinate or not, targeted recommendations to shape the policy measure can be made. The research question in this study is: “Which contextual influences, individual and/or social group influences and vaccination specific issues influence the intention of teenagers aged 14-19 to get all the offered vaccinations of the Dutch National Immunization Programme (NIP)?” Methods First, a systematic literature review was composed to identify the determinants with the largest effect on vaccine hesitancy. Additionally, an online questionnaire with two open questions was conducted. The questionnaire gathered background characteristics and questions around contextual influences, individual/social group influences and vaccination specific issues. The study was conducted at two high schools in the Netherlands, where 618 teenagers aged 14-19, were asked to fill in the questionnaire. SPSS was used in order to analyse the outcomes of the questionnaires by correlations, comparing means and the ANOVA. The correlations were used to measure the dependent variable ‘intention to get all the offered vaccinations’ (interval) with the main independent variables: contextual influences, individual/social group influences, and vaccination specific issues (interval). For the dependent variable and the background characteristics (categoric), the means and ANOVA were calculated. Results The response rate was 39.3% (243/618). The results of the conceptual influences show a significant relation between the determinants ‘religion/culture/gender and socioeconomic group’ and ‘geographic barriers’ and the intention to get all the offered vaccinations. Of the individual/social group influences, the determinants ‘knowledge awareness’, ‘personal experience and health system and providers- trust’ and ‘beliefs, attitudes, and motivation about health and prevention’’ show a significant relation with the intention to get all the offered vaccinations. The vaccination specific issues determinants influencing the intention to get all the offered vaccinations are: ‘design of vaccination program/mode of delivery’ and ‘risk/benefit (scientific evidence)’. Conclusion Shaping the new policy measurement with strategies that influence the intention of teenagers to get all the offered vaccinations can make the policy measurement successful, encourage future vaccine acceptance by teenagers and minimise the potential for the development of hesitancy. The main point where strategies should be developed on is information and the provision of information to increase the knowledge of teenagers about the safety of vaccinations, of which vaccinations the NIP consists, why vaccinations are important for someone’s health, what happens with the health of people when they do not vaccinate based on religious or cultural reasons, the risk for teenagers to get a vaccine-related disease, how well a vaccination protects against getting the disease and about the risk of side effects from vaccination. Teenagers can be informed by letter/leaflet, parents/guardians, school-based programs, or the internet. Additionally, teenagers must be satisfied with the distance to the place where they can get vaccinated, and there must be trust in the advice a doctor/nurse gives teenagers.
Item Type:Essay (Master)
Clients:
GGD, Enschede
Faculty:TNW: Science and Technology
Subject:70 social sciences in general
Programme:Health Sciences MSc (66851)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/78114
Export this item as:BibTeX
EndNote
HTML Citation
Reference Manager

 

Repository Staff Only: item control page