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Three Dimensions to See it All in One Position : the development and clinical usability of a real-time depth-based markerless navigation system for hologram-guided surgery on the Microsoft HoloLens 2™

Groenenberg, Annabel (2021) Three Dimensions to See it All in One Position : the development and clinical usability of a real-time depth-based markerless navigation system for hologram-guided surgery on the Microsoft HoloLens 2™.

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Abstract:Every day, surgeons are confronted with complex patient-specific anatomical cases. A good insight in the full three-dimensional, anatomical configuration of each patient is essential for a successful surgical outcome. Currently, three-dimensional medical imaging data are displayed on a two-dimensional screen, which removes a full dimension from this data. Furthermore, when these data are used for image-guided surgery, the surgeon constantly has to switch between the operating field and the two-dimensional screen that displays the medical patient data, which causes the switching focus problem. To overcome these problems, a three-dimensional medical visualization technique should be developed that is able to provide the operator with patient-specific data in the correct location while keeping the sterile field intact. Therefore, a depth-based, markerless holographic navigation system has been created that is able to overlay a patient-specific 3D anatomy onto the patient or target 3D model. A phantom study and a cadaver study have been conducted to determine precision, accuracy and clinical applicability. The navigation system created in this thesis has the possibility to become a suitable three-dimensional visualization method for clinical use. Further research is needed to improve the total holographic superimposition misalignment on the target object, to improve the system workflow and to solve problems with the visual loss of clinical instruments during use. However, once these challenges have been overcome, this navigation system would be feasible for use in markerless, depth-based hologram-guided surgery.
Item Type:Essay (Master)
Faculty:TNW: Science and Technology
Subject:44 medicine, 50 technical science in general, 54 computer science
Programme:Technical Medicine MSc (60033)
Awards:ETZ Wetenschapdag
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/86134
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