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Het effect van vicarious experience op self-efficacy en taakprestatie in technologie-ondersteunde beweeginterventies

Plattel, Moniek (2015) Het effect van vicarious experience op self-efficacy en taakprestatie in technologie-ondersteunde beweeginterventies.

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Abstract:Background & aim of the study In the Western world, there has been an increase in the number of people showing a sedentary lifestyle. Several E-health interventions have been developed to increase physical activity. In classical behaviour research, self-efficacy proves to be predictive for task performance. Self-efficacy should be improved in order to achieve optimum performance levels regarding physical activity. This study investigates whether vicarious experience has the potential to change self-efficacy and task performance in technology-supported interventions. Method An experimental design with repeated measures has been used to conduct the research. Subjects (n=36) came once to the laboratory of Roessingh Research & Development to walk six times from A to B in exactly 14, 16 or 18 seconds, while they were blindfolded and wearing scuba fins. Subjects in the experimental condition saw in advance of every task short films of a role model performing the task correctly. Subjects in the control condition performed the tasks without being shown the videos in advance. Dependent variables were task-dependent self-efficacy and task performance. Results No significant differences were found between the two conditions in terms of average self-efficacy (p = .416), average task performance (p = .101) and percentage successful accomplished tasks (p = .411). There was no difference in the patterns of self-efficacy (p = .188) and task performance (p = .546). No differences were found in the patterns of self-efficacy (p = .400) and task performance (p = .357) across the two conditions. Subjects with high scores on self-efficacy did not score better on task performance than subjects with lower scores on self-efficacy (p = .599). Conclusion & discussion Although it was observed that subjects in the experimental condition imitated the gait of the role models, there was no statistical evidence to support the change in task performance. Results show that vicarious experience did not change self-efficacy nor task performance. Further research, using tasks more related to physical activity, is needed to investigate whether vicarious experience has the potential to change self-efficacy and task performance in technology-supported interventions.
Item Type:Essay (Bachelor)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:77 psychology
Programme:Psychology BSc (56604)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/68483
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