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Exploring the relationship between Residuals from Acceleration predicted Heart Rate (RAHR) and self-reported momentary and retrospective stress and arousal

Krüger, J.M. (2018) Exploring the relationship between Residuals from Acceleration predicted Heart Rate (RAHR) and self-reported momentary and retrospective stress and arousal.

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Abstract:As more and more people are buying wearables and are interested in monitoring their stress level with them, it gets increasingly important to find a good way of inferring psychological measures such as stress and arousal from physiologically measurable variables such as heart rate. As laboratory experiments may not be able to predict relationships in real life, a wearable and experience sampling study taking place in daily life was chosen for the current study. Because heart rate changes are associated with both a physical and a psychological part, it is important to try to account for the physical part when the interest lies in the heart rate changes mostly associated with psychological changes. Previously, there have been different approaches to do this, which are all not practical for a study in daily life. In the present study, a new approach to calculating the psychologically caused part of heart rate called “Residuals from Acceleration predicted Heart Rate” (RAHR) is explored. In this approach, a regression is made for heart rate predicted by magnitude of acceleration (physical activity). The positive residuals of this are taken as RAHR. This approach can be implemented with only a heart rate sensor and an accelerometer in the wearable. A correlation for acceleration and heart rate was found and RAHRs were implemented. Unfortunately, no relationship could be found between RAHR and the four measures of psychological experience, namely momentary and retrospective experienced stress, and momentary and retrospective experienced arousal. Still, a new method for calculating the psychological part of heart rate has been tested which can be used in the field instead of the laboratory. This method now must be validated further in order to see if it may be usable for giving feedback about people’s emotional state. Further research is needed for this.
Item Type:Essay (Master)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:77 psychology
Programme:Psychology MSc (66604)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/74409
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