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Cortical involvement of slow wave activity predicts scene memory : a PCA-approach to memory consolidation

Serweta, A.K. (2020) Cortical involvement of slow wave activity predicts scene memory : a PCA-approach to memory consolidation.

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Abstract:Slow wave activity (0.5-4 Hz) has been linked consistently to memory consolidation during sleep. Interestingly, slow waves types can be delineated on the basis of distinct synchronization mechanisms: 1) arousal-dependent synchronization, yields large, Type 1 slow waves, and 2) a homeostatic, cortico-cortical mechanism, synchronizes smaller, Type 2 slow waves. Memory consolidation or learning-dependent adjustments of neural connections during sleep are mainly associated with such local, homeostatic events. Conventionally, sleep-dependent effects of slow wave activity on memory were examined with measures of power or power density. Considering anterior predominance of large, Type 1 slow waves, power-based measures may fail to capture learningdependent/homeostatic changes in incidence of smaller, Type 2 slow waves. The present study introduced cortical involvement of slow wave activity, by means of spatial, principal component analyses (PCA), as a novel approach to study memory consolidation during sleep. To this end, a high-density EEG dataset was utilized. Participants performed a subsequent memory paradigm, using real-life sceneries, then they took a nap upon which they performed a scene recognition task. Effects of cortical involvement of slow wave activity on scene recognition were assessed. In addition, conventional analyses of slow wave power were performed to validate the novel approach. Against the background of fronto-central power predominance, robust memory correlates of both parieto-central involvement and power of slow waves were found during nap sleep. Thus, spatial PCA may provide a novel tool to assess learning-dependent changes in cortical involvement of slow wave activity and relate these to memory consolidation processes.
Item Type:Essay (Bachelor)
Faculty:BMS: Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences
Subject:77 psychology
Programme:Psychology BSc (56604)
Link to this item:http://purl.utwente.nl/essays/82310
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